Showing posts with label Education and Parenting. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Education and Parenting. Show all posts

6/08/2022

 


Extra-curricular activities are fantastic for children in terms of their overall development, health and wellbeing. The good news is there are so many options when it comes to hobbies and extra-curricular clubs. One great option you could consider is tennis lessons. I have teamed up with a gym in Watford to share some of the reasons why you should consider tennis lessons for your child.

 

Tennis is Great for Health and Fitness

 

Anything that requires an element of physical exertion is great for young people because it helps to improve their physical and mental health. As they run around the court, stretching, and swinging, your child will become fitter, leaner, and more flexible. What’s more, when exercising, endorphins are released in the brain that allow for improved mood.

 

Tennis Allows for Socialisation

 

Lots of hobbies are solitary pursuits, such as playing an instrument. Tennis, on the other hand, offers children the chance to meet likeminded people and make friends, which helps support their social skills.

 

Tennis Improves Motor Skills

 

When playing tennis, children are able to practise their hand-eye coordination, as well as strengthening their muscles for greater accuracy. These motor skills are vital for everyday tasks so its important for children to practise using them as much as possible whilst they’re young.

 

Sport Enhances Confidence

 

Children who play sport, such as tennis, are given an opportunity to practise and improve their skills, which helps them to become more confident. Confidence is important for young people because it what allows them to take an optimistic approach on life, try new things and step out of their comfort zone. For instance, they might not have previously felt comfortable engaging in classroom discussions, but with a newfound confidence they might feel more capable of raising their hand and voicing their opinion.

 



Mindfulness is all about focussing on the present moment, accepting one’s thoughts and feelings, as well as any bodily sensations. It’s a type of therapeutic technique to reduce feelings of anxiety and depression that are caused by obtrusive thoughts. With all that said, you might want to consider exploring mindfulness with your child so that they are better able to manage their emotions. Read on for some tips from an independent school in Enfield.

 

Mindful Walks

 

Taking a walk through nature is a great opportunity to practise mindfulness because it’s a very sensory activity. Next time you’re out for a walk with your child, ask them to think about what they can see, hear, feel, smell, or even taste. Share some examples of your own to inspire them, such as the leaves crunching underfoot or the soft breeze on your face. By tuning into the senses within a given moment, your child will feel distracted against anything that might be making them feel stressed or anxious, like school exams or friendship problems.

 

Mindful Bedtime

 

Practising mindfulness at bedtime is a great way to help your child doze off at night. Encourage them to lie down in bed, close their eyes, and consider how each part of their body is feeling, from the top of their head to the tips of their toes. Ask them to work their way up or down, considering how their body feels against the sheets and mattress.

 

Mindful Snacks

 

Mindfulness can be practised when doing the most mundane of things, like eating a snack. Encourage your child to truly embrace the moment by thinking about the texture and flavour of what they’re eating, rather than letting the moment pass by without giving it much thought. The trick is to encourage them to savour each bite.

 

If you are looking for more ideas when it comes to exploring mindfulness with your child, there are lots of apps and information online that you can look into. Just remember to take it slow and practise often until it starts to come naturally to them.


 



There are many reasons why you might want to consider encouraging your child to start a journal. Journaling is great from an academic perspective, but also in terms of one’s health and wellbeing. I have teamed up with an independent boys’ school in London to share some of the benefits of journaling in further detail.

 

Journaling Enhances Literacy Skills

 

As with any skill, practise makes perfect. With that said, if your child writes in a journal every day, they will become better at spelling and grammar, and their vocabulary will likely improve. This is great from an educational point of view as it will help them with their essay writing at school.

 

Journaling is an Outlet for Emotions

 

Children have a lot of complex emotions that they need to work through, and journaling can help them work through these emotions and handle their private thoughts. When it comes to mental health, it’s important to be able to get things off our chests and figure out what triggers us, which is why it’s great for children.

 

Journaling Encourages Self-Reflection

 

When children write in a journal, they are able to reflect on what happened during their day, as well as their thoughts and feelings. Self-reflection is important because it helps us determine what we like and dislike, and what makes us feel calm and content or sparks frustration.

 

Journaling Improves Memory

 

Another great benefit of writing in a journal is that it’s like a little workout for the brain. It can help with memory and cognitive function, which further contributes to improved academic progress.

 

Journaling Sparks Ambition

 

People often find it easier to achieve their goals if these goals are written down and ticked off. Journaling is great for this and can spark ambition, encouraging a child to work towards various goals.

5/04/2022

 


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Compassion is a natural human response to seeing others in pain or distress. Children are capable of this too and there are ways that you can build their compassion. For example, an independent school in London suggests that parents spend time teaching their children about the different emotions that we experience as people and why. Below is more on how you can deliver this lesson.

 

Understanding Body Language

As mentioned above, to teach your child about compassion you should ideally talk to them about the different emotions that we feel and why. Understanding this can help them to be better clued up about how others feel and become a better detector of body language. Only then can we make efforts to actually help.

 


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Chores give children a glimpse into what adult life is like by giving them the chance to assume responsibility and contribute at home. There are also many fundamental life lessons that they can take away too, like how to clean up and take care of themselves. From a development perspective, they can develop their independence, resilience, and a good work ethic. Below is information from an IB school in the UK on how chores help children with their development.

 



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Your child will meet a range of people from all different walks of life. They may have differing views of them and can teach them many things. Knowing how to respect others is a big part of socializing and raising your child to be respectful of all should be a part of this. Below is some guidance from a prep school in Buckinghamshire on how to teach your child to respect other cultures.

 

Use a Map

The world is very big and diverse. There are 195 countries around the world, all with their own identity. This is a great place to start and can help your child to develop a broad understanding of where different people are from.

 

Treating Everyone as Equals

We are all equals that deserve respect and to be treated kindly. This is a message that you can send to your child by doing so in your interactions with others. 

 


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School trips give children the opportunity to explore the world around them and put what they’ve learned into practice. They can gain new, unique experiences and create lasting memories with their friends. There’s much more to school trips too. For example, they teach children how to present themselves when outside of their school environment. A nursery in Amersham has shared more on the benefits of school trips for children with us below.

 

Taking Responsibility

When on a school trip, children go out and represent their school. It’s their duty to uphold a positive image and not misrepresent themselves and their peers. This can teach them about responsibility and to be mindful of their behaviour. 

 

Open-Mindedness

There’s so much that you can learn by being surrounded by the same people in the same environment. Travelling opens children to new ideas and ways of thinking that are different to their own. At the same time, they can develop respect for others’ ideas and their cultures.

3/05/2022

 



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As your child grows up, they’ll need to learn how to do things for themselves and become less reliant on you. Teaching them life lessons can help them when you're not there and be good practice for the future. We have teamed up with a prep school in East Sussex to share 5 ways that you can help your child become more independent.


 

Chores

Chores give children a sense of responsibility and ownership which can help them feel and become more independent. As they learn to do things for themselves like wash the dishes and put on their own washing, they’ll become less reliant on you and others around them. 

 


Get Them to Join In

When you’re cooking or doing other things, get your child to join in so that you can teach them. Working side by side, you can pass down secret family recipes and teach them how to do things properly. Getting them involved at a young age will help them to form good habits and passions.

 


Deal with Mistakes Gently

When doing something for the first time, chances are your child won’t get it exactly right but that’s okay as they’ll help them to learn. Being gentle is important as it will help them view it as a learning curb and enjoy trying new things. Take time in teaching them how to do it correctly and break it down into small steps as children require granular information to understand.

 


Phase Changes In

Children need routine and consistency. Changes can create disruption and make it difficult for them to adapt which can lead to feelings of distress. When making changes of this nature, phase them in gently with notice and positive encouragement so that they feel less anxious. That way they’ll be more receptive and slowly grow their independence.

 


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Tutoring can help children struggling at school and give them an advantage over their peers. While it is an added expense for parents, there are lots of benefits to having it. It can get children in the habit of doing their work for example and improve their grades. But is it necessary? A senior school in Surrey points to 3 signs that can help you decide whether your child actually needs a tutor.

 

Your Child’s a Genius 

Some children are naturally gifted with a higher IQ than others and need more challenges. While schools can do their best, these children, funnily enough, feel as if they’re not reaching their full potential. This is because of classroom and teacher limitations. A tutor on the other hand can help your child take their studies to a higher level and teach content ahead of what’s expected. Having this kind of support can help your child to flourish and make full use of their ability.

 

Falling Behind

Poor grades and participation in class may be a sign that your child is struggling academically and needs further support. It may also be a sign that they have little motivation. A tutor can help your child, in that case, to take their studies seriously by spending time with them to understand their concerns and showing an interest in their work.

 

Your Child Has Upcoming Exams

GCSE years are a crucial time in a child’s life. There’s a lot of content that they’ll need to get their head around and remember for their exams in order to do well. Revision is key for exam success and getting it done involves discipline. This can be hard for children as they can procrastinate and struggle to make sense of concepts without their teacher. Tutors come well versed in the curriculum and some often hold examiner experience. This means that they can help them prepare for their exams and the types of questions that they’ll come across.

 



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As industries change and adapt, so do the skills needed to be built by the education system. As a result, more is being added to the curriculum like coding which was introduced to schools in 2014. There are many benefits to having coding lessons in schools as an independent school in Buckinghamshire explains below.

 

Transferable Skills

Regardless of whether or not your child wants to pursue a career in technology, coding lessons can help them build skills that will make them more employable and better prepared for work. Skills like problem-solving, creative thinking, and much more. In whatever career your child pursues, whether music or engineering, they’ll face problems where they need to apply themselves and think of solutions.

 

Digital Literacy 

More and more of life is becoming engulfed by technology. Having knowledge of how that technology works can help children in their day-to-day life and help them be ready to face the changing job market. Knowing how to code will open doors for them and ensure that they don’t need to retrain.

 

Patience

Coding is something that requires patience and lots of it. There are lots of different solutions that can be applied but not all will produce the desired result. That means playing with alternatives and trial and error.

 

Fun

Creating things is fun - especially when they are digital creations that you can see come to life. As they find solutions that work, they’ll feel overjoyed, and their confidence will grow along with their knowledge.

 

Greater Academic Performance

The thinking skills that your child gains and enhances through coding will help them in other subjects throughout the curriculum. Subjects like science where hypotheses are created and put to the test. This can help them to secure more attractive grades and yield greater success.

 


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After their GCSEs, your child will have a whole new set of choices to make about what they want to pursue at college. That might be purely A Levels, vocational courses, or a mix of both. To help you support your child with their choices, we have teamed up with a private college in Somerset to create a parents’ guide to A levels.

 

What are A-Levels?

A-level courses are in-depth courses designed to help and prepare children for the next stage in their careers. That includes both formal employment and further education. Unlike GCSEs, they require more commitment. Your child will have fewer scheduled study sessions but will be required to carry out more independent study by reading around their subject to enrich their learning. 

 
How Are A-Levels Graded?

A levels follow the old grading style that GCSEs once had and are awarded grades between an E and an A*. 

 

Free Periods

As briefly touched on earlier, there are fewer contact hours with A levels. Instead, your child may have “free periods” or study sessions where they are advised to spend time in the library revising and going over their notes. By spending their time wisely in this way, your child will have less work to do when at home which will make it more manageable and easier to remember. This is especially key as A-Levels cover much more content than GCSEs.

 

How Are A-Levels Examined? 

Most A levels have an exam element and others are complimented by coursework. 

 

When Do A-Level Exams Take Place? 

Exams usually take place in May which makes Easter the ideal time to revise, although it’s better to start sooner.

 

How Can I Help My Child Pick the Right A-Levels?

As A-Levels are huge commitments, it's important for your child to pick the subjects that they feel comfortable with and are genuinely interested by. Your child’s teachers will also be able to tell you whether they’re capable of continuing on to an A level.

2/22/2022

 


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Being a mother can be rewarding but also very stressful. There are so many new things to learn and take care of, and it can feel like there's not enough time in the day to take care of your needs. But making sure you're happy and healthy is a vital part of being a good parent for your child.


1. Get Enough Sleep

Many mothers find it difficult to get enough sleep with a new baby in the house, but lack of sleep can lead to health problems like depression and anxiety. Make sure you're getting at least six hours or more if possible. Taking naps when your child does can help you feel well-rested throughout the day.


2. Eat Healthy Foods

Having a child adds so many expenses to your life, so making sure you eat properly is very important for maintaining both mental and physical health. Ensure that most of your meals are balanced, and don't worry about depriving yourself of certain "treat" items every once in a while! Eating healthily will also make it easier for you to lose any extra weight you may have gained while pregnant.

12/10/2021

 


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Your child may want to undertake A Levels but may not wish to remain at their school to do so. This is fine – for many young adults, this is a healthy decision and a way to make changes in their life.


Meeting new friends, having a new routine and journey to school can be very refreshing for children and if your child would like to choose a new school or college for sixth form, it’s important that you take their request seriously.


Visits are vital

Make sure to find out when the sixth form has open days for parents and pupils. Book a spot and attend with your child. This senior school in Middlesex takes these open days very seriously and it’s a chance for parents and pupils alike to see the environment and meet the staff.


This first look is important as it will give you both a chance to assess the school and the amenities.


Your child might have a strong reaction to one school and not to another so it’s important to book a few visits.

 


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Arts & crafts are a vital part of a child’s education. Some children take to arts more easily than others but all can enjoy the various activities when they’re presented in a fun way.


Arts & crafts support children’s cognitive learning and their hand-eye coordination in addition to developing creativity. For children who tend towards highly-strung, arts & crafts offer a great way for them to relax.


There are many activities which you can do with your child at home to support their skills and enjoyment in this area. Here are some ideas for preschoolers.


  • Finger painting – let them go wild; kids love the sensory feeling of dipping their hands into paint and if you give them permission to do it, they’ll participate with gusto. Just put down a plastic sheet and ensure your child is wearing old clothes!


  • Sticking – it doesn’t matter what they’re sticking to so much as they have a chance to do it. You can use a glue stick to avoid too much mess! Let your child cut out some pictures from an old magazine and make a collage or let them stick bits and bobs from your sewing box onto an old tissue box to make a treasure chest. Good items for sticking include lace, buttons, sequins and trims.


  • Model making – whether you use clay, papier-mache, or just old boxes, there’s a real joy for children to be found in making a model. They can make robots fairly easily out of boxes, houses or cars also make a good choice. Help them make a model of their favourite animal from old newspaper and paste or for simplicities sake, make snakes from air-drying clay and paint them after they’re dry!


As your child grows, explore different mediums with them. Older children might enjoy crochet, patchwork, woodwork, and embroidery in addition to watercolour painting or sketching.


Your child’s school will usually have a robust arts curriculum – like this independent girls’ school in Surrey. At schools like this, the arts are seen as vital to children’s development.

 


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The big day is almost upon you and you can scarcely believe it but your child is due to start school! This is a momentous occasion and both you and your child might feel nervous about the changes. That’s natural – what’s important is that you don’t show nerves to your child.


It’s also important not to build things up too much – don’t make a big fuss about it or your child will worry that it’s going to be a big shock. Discuss the changes with your child and what they can expect but keep the conversation light.


Common issues

There are many common issues that small children find tricky about the transition to big school, here are just a few.


  • Toilets – will they be big or scary? Can your child manage alone?


  • Lunchtime – if your child is a fussy eater or doesn’t like to sit still, it’s important to discuss lunchtime expectations with them. Slow eaters should be given packed lunches which are easily managed – for example, don’t pack a whole apple because it will take your child too long to eat, instead, cut it up for them and add a little lemon juice to keep it fresh.


  • Staying hydrated – ensure your child knows what their water bottle looks like and where to find it.


  • Missing you – this is the hardest one of all and there are a number of ways in which to tackle it. Reassure your child that you will be there or their caregiver will be there at the end of the day. Give them a handkerchief with your perfume on it.


The transition to big school can be a lot of fun but there will be natural challenges along the way.


Good schools like this day nursery in Kensington have a strong pastoral care team who are well used to dealing with the common issues which may arise and they will support your child all the way.

 


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Social skills are just like the other skills which children need to learn such as reading, writing, running, speaking and so forth.


Some children are naturally good at socialising and others aren’t. For some children, social skills just develop slower than other children’s and you needn’t worry or stress about it because it often ‘rights itself’ as the child gets older. Here are some top tips for helping your child to develop their social skills:


  • Ensure they have plenty of interaction with other children, this might be through clubs and playgroups or playdates with friends.

  • Encourage good manners in day-to-day life, no pushing, no grabbing and always please and thank you.

  • Encourage good listening skills; for children to succeed on the playground they must be able to hear others’ wishes and worries or they won’t be seen as a good playmat.

  • Good sportsmanship is vital and that means no tears upon losing a board game! Help your child to understand that you win some, you lose some! A good way around this is to stop letting them win at every board game because that’s not a natural state of affairs.


If your child’s teacher has mentioned that your child isn’t slotting in very well, it’s important that your child is supported to gain the correct skills to enable them to make friends. This independent school in Surrey has a robust pastoral care system so that children who might struggle, don’t for long!


Speak with your child’s teacher to gain insight into where your child needs more support. It might be that they’re shy or that they’re a little bossy – ask the teacher for tips on supporting your child’s development in these areas. Most teachers are well-versed in this and will gladly help you.

12/08/2021

 


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Music is a part of our culture and can be enjoyed by all ages. But as children grow up, they often stop playing an instrument or singing in the choir because of the time commitment required to learn new skills. Online violin lessons are available for students to continue their music education from the comfort of home!


What Are the Benefits of Music Lessons for Kids?

Music lessons are beneficial for every child, regardless of age or skill level. Some benefits include:

  • Improved concentration and focus

  • Self-confidence in public speaking opportunities

  • Developmental skills that can lead to other academic success down the road (fostering creativity & problem solving)


How Do I Find a Good Instructor?

The best way to find an excellent instructor is through online reviews and recommendations from friends, family members, or colleagues. You’ll want to find somewhere that has a staff of highly qualified music teachers with years of teaching experience.


What Types of Instruments Are Most Popular With Kids?

The most popular instruments vary depending on the child’s age and interests. However, some general trends include:

  • Piano & keyboard lessons for young children

  • Violin lessons for elementary school-age children

  • Vocals for high school students and adult

10/21/2021

 



Being a part of a community can be a source of empowerment for a child. Allowing them to feel a sense of belonging and love. It's important to exercise an active community involvement with your child from an early age to forge connections and help them in developing their own identity.

 

A nursery in Shoreditch shares more on the importance of community involvement for children.

 



Fine motor skills are responsible for many of our everyday activities from enjoying our favourite pasta to catching up with our friends over social media. To help your child develop the small muscles found in their hands and feet, there are many activities that you can do together. 

 

We have partnered with a pre-prep school in Hertfordshire to share a list of activities that you can do with your child to strengthen their fine motor skills.